ITSM Weekly the Podcast (Week34 & 35) - ITSMF Video and Post Show Episode - Matthew Hooper VigilantGuy Digital Transformentalist - Create High Performing IT
Many people ask me why I am part of certain associations.  SIM (Society of Information Management), HDI (Help Desk Institute), ISACA (Information Systems Audit and Control Association), and ITSMF (Information Technology Service Management Forum).  The first reason is to meet smart people.  I don’t have time to research the latest and greatest trends, practices, and keep up on who’s who.  Since 2004, I have had a dual role of chief marketing and technologist.  Each of those disciplines area in and of themselves morphing at lightning speed.  So to keep up, I’ve found networking with folks for a few hours and hearing a presentation on certain topics keeps me in the know.   Sadly, however, the value of networking groups have diminished as committees are formed and political agendas are pushed.  The value of volunteer-ism is diminished because of prominence or association. What do I mean?  Take for instance the hard working independent consultant who is out working it, and offers to give his experience of deploying a Service Desk at 5 clients vs. the Service Desk Manager for a well known financial institute that has hired guns at their disposal for the hard work.   The committees for choosing speakers all too frequently discount the independent because of fear that they will try to sell the audience, and will choose the big company profile.  Even if the IC has proven to put a lot into the organization.  Give me a break!   First off, 30-50% of the audience at these conferences have either been, are, or will be a consultant at some point in their career.  Second, a SPAMMY consultant is pretty easy to call out.  Anyone who has been at this for a while knows that if you pitch at a conference you loose your audience and credibility fast.  Staying hard-core has always shown value and increased the awareness of your skills and thus led to follow on work.  Even if you are not a polished speaker, simply speaking from the heart on real world experiences and engaging the audience in a mutual discussion will drive more value.  So committee members I call out to you, if you want my continued membership.  Get the workers out in front of us and save the experts for panel discussions.  We want to hear “real world”.   Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying we shouldn’t have real practitioners from the Big name companies.  Believe me, I appreciate their discussions.  However, if you have attended these conferences and meetings, you have seen that it is “always” these folks.  I’m saying give us people who are dynamic, exciting and know what they are talking about, regardless of their role, company or title.  Just keep it real!

Ths week in IT Service Management Weekly the Podcast, Chris, Matt and I record live from the ITSMF Fusion 10 conference.  It’s only 20 minutes, so I have also put in here the following podcast.
Enjoy


LIVE from itSMF Fusion 2010 ITSM Weekly The Podcast (Week 34) from ServiceSphere on Vimeo.


ITSM Weekly The Podcast (Episode 35) from ServiceSphere on Vimeo.

I See A Pink Door and I Wanted Painted Black
What happens when a CIO, a Service Desk Manager and an Industry Junkie Chat Weekly?!
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Episode 35 Topics:
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Digital Transformentalist Twitter: @VigilantGuy http://twitter.com/vigilantguy Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewbhooper Web: http://www.vigilantguy.com Matt Hooper is an industry advocate for Service Management strategies and best practices around Enterprise Service Management. For over 20 years Matt has instituted methodologies for business intelligence and optimization. Leveraging technology to drive business outcomes, he has built an industry reputation for his highly effective approach to creating value through Service Management. Matt is active on Social Media known as VigilantGuy, and co-hosts the weekly podcast: Hacking Business Technology. HackBizTech.com

2 Comments
  • Anonymous says:

    Well said. Having spent a little time at one of the organizations you call out on this, I have to agree that there’s more than a little entrenched politics and group think that put up barriers to new speakers. Keep pressing the issue with these organizations. There’s nothing wrong with experienced presenters, but change is an integral part of IT, isn’t it? Why is it that so-called “vendors” are immediately considered to be mere hucksters while so-called “consultants” who sell their experience and expertise never have their motives called into question? Aren’t both representative of the people who actually provide the solutions that members require? Who better to talk about technology than the people who work for companies who design, develop, and actually deliver that technology?

  • Carlos says:

    Great post Matt.

    What I’ll add is that I’ve been in both working environments over the last few years. A high level ‘worker’ with a multi national financial services firm and now as a founder of a small consulting firm (essentially an IC ). While an ’employee’ I would be called directly and asked to ‘speak’ at the conferences. Now, some of those same organizations that used to call me….not only no longer call but actually reject my submissions for conferences.

    If it wasn’t for my book, I doubt I would have done even one speaking engagement or webinar.

    So….. you’re right on the mark.

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Matthew Hooper

Digital Transformentalist